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GRANITE COUNTERTOPS

Granite is a beautiful natural product that is taken directly from the Earth. Each individual slab of granite or other natural stone will look slightly different. Our objective is to have a custom approach to each of your projects - treat your visions, goals and objectives as a unique set of criteria to work with. Each project  is an opportunity to take our accumulated knowledge of natural stone and apply it in a new fresh way.
  • What is Granite?

         Granite is crystalline rock that is harder than marble with large mineral grains. Formed ov­er millions of years from compressed molten rock under the Earth's surface, granite is extremely hard and durable.
         Granite consists of orthoclase and plagioclase feldspars, quartz, hornblende, biotite, muscovite and minor accessory minerals such as magnetite, garnet, zircon and apatite. Rarely, a pyroxene is present. 

  • Why Granite Countertop is the best desigion for kitchen?
         
         Natural stone is the primary choice for many home owners, architects and interior designers because it is strong, versatile, multi-dimensional and heat resistant and as well as being is beautiful, elegant and stylish. It is also available in many colors, designs, varieties and prices and we can usually find a range to suit any taste or budget.
         Normal cookware, kitchen knives and cutlery can all be used on granite countertops without fear of scratching the surface. Man-made surfaces such as Formica, Corian, Wood Veneer, Avanza and Silestone cannot match up to the qualities found in granite.
  • How to Take Care of Granite Countertops

  1.          Use a ph neutral cleanser and a soft cloth. Don’t use harsh cleansers or scrubbers. While granite is very durable, acidic cleansers and sponges that can scratch will wear down a sealant. Use ph neutral soap to clean your countertops and steer clear of windex or vinegar. Stone cleaner works as well as simple dish soap.
  2.         Wipe the top down regularly. Keeping the surface free of dirt and grime will help preserve granite. Clean your countertop regularly with warm water and a few drops of dish or antibacterial detergent using a soft cloth. Rinse the surface thoroughly with clean water and dry with a soft cloth.
  3.          Blot spills up immediately. If you spill something on the surface, blot with a paper towel or soft cloth right away. Do not wipe spilled liquids, like juice or milk, because this can spread them around your countertop.
  4.         Dry any spilled liquids with a dishcloth. Granite countertops and properly sealed stone will repel most stains if the spills are cleaned promptly. Use a dry, dishcloth to dry your granite after any spills, so moisture does not seep into the pores of the stone.
  5.         Do not put hot pots or pans on granite. Hot cooking pots will not damage the surface and granite can withstand high temperatures, but extreme or constant temperature changes can harm your stone. For instance, avoid leaving hot pans sitting on granite in a chilly room.
  6.         Use coasters under cups or liquid-filled pots. Protect your granite from moisture absorption by using coasters under anything filled with liquid. Be especially careful with dark colored liquids, like red wine or juice
  7. Disinfect with water and alcohol. Granite naturally repels bacteria, but if you want to disinfect your countertops more than what soap and water can, use water and 91% isopropyl alcohol. Mix the solution up with a 50/50 ratio, spray it on the countertops, and let it sit for three to five minutes. Rinse with water and dry with a soft dishcloth.
  8.         Use baking soda and water on oil marks. If you spill oil-based liquids on your granite, like milk or grease, you may need to remove some stains. Make a paste out of baking soda and water, slather it on the oil marks, cover it and let it sit for several hours or overnight.
  9.        Use baking soda and hydrogen peroxide on water-based marks. Coffee, juice and wine may leave marks if it’s not cleaned up immediately and penetrates the stone. Add just enough hydrogen peroxide to baking soda to make a paste. Apply it to any water-based stains or marks, cover it and let it sit overnight.
  • Frequency of Sealing and Why It’s Important

         Because granite is a natural stone and is generally penetrable within its porous surface, sealants are an easy and effective way to protect granite countertops. Some people seal their granite countertops once every six months to a year, though stone can never be oversealed. 
         The best way to tell when you need to seal your stone is to test it. As there are varying guidelines, it is important to pay attention to the condition of your granite. One test for determining whether or not your countertops need sealant is to add several drops of water on top of the granite, in several locations. Let it sit for 30 minutes. If the water has penetrated the surface within and has darkened the granite, it is time to reseal. Other indicators include dull places on otherwise glossy countertops. Paying attention to the duration between the first couple of reseals can help you set a schedule for future maintenance.


BASIC GRANITE SELECTIONS

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Ornamental White Granite
Basic Group
Noturno Black Granite, Basic Group
Noturno Black Granite
Basic Group